LottoLab programmes: Human perception Bumblebees Robots ‘My School‘ Street science  Musical spaces    Media: Books, television, radio, popular press

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‘Street Science‘ is a celebration of uncertainty, because only through uncertainty is there the potential for creativity and understanding.

Through their interaction with, or even participation in, our Street Science projects and performances, we seek to place people in the unique context of ‘seeing themselves see’ – to offer the opportunity for them to observe the intimately private process by which we all ‘make sense’ of ourselves and the world around us. Only by understanding that our behaviours are responses shaped by one’s ecology is there the potential to become an active agent in this process, in order to change how we respond in the future... and as a result increase the potential for choice, creativity and compassion.

In contrast to public art, Street Science is about doing real experiments in public spaces (including in our lab), often on the public themselves, and sometimes by the public, thereby making them integral to the process of exploration and discovery. Of course the risk of Street Science is public failure, since most experiments – almost by definition – have risk. But without risk there is nothing.

Street Science is also about experiencing the essence of science. Science isn't captured in the Methods section of a paper. Nor is it about what’s known or even what isn’t known. At its most basic level, science is nothing more than asking good questions and exploring those questions through a process of playing games and making puzzles. A good question is less about extending into the unknown and more about challenging our underlying assumptions about what we thought was true already. When thought of in this way, it’s obvious that we all ‘do science‘ hundreds of times a day every day, by discovering and exploring through interaction. When interaction is made conscious and combined with reflection, that is ‘science‘.


Real sound


By making music using binaural recording technology, we explore the process of recording sound not as it exists in air, but as our eardrum actually ‘hears’ it.

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Real sound